Oysters, a weekend treat

If I’m lucky, a weekend market shop at South Melbourne Market, also means a shop at the oyster-shucking end of Aptus Seafood where I get to choose a few of the delightful molluscs for a quick au naturale bite. A drop of lemon and we are good to go.

They are a great source of zinc, iron, calcium, selenium, vitamin A and vitamin B12.

brunyisland

Oysters Australia states Australian growers farm three main species of oyster in our waters.

  • Pacific Oyster in SA, TAS and a little in NSW
  • Sydney Rock Oyster in NSW, QLD and a little in WA
  • Angasi Oyster in small volumes across all states.
  • The Milky Oyster and the Blacklip Oyster are also found in small volumes.

Sydney Rock Oysters and the Angasi oyster are native to Australia, while Pacific oysters are native to Japan and produced mostly in China and the US.

I’ve only ever seen the Angasi oyster on documentaries and hope to one day try them. They have a stronger flavour which lingers minutes after being eaten.

The oysters I’ve eaten at the market are St Helen’s (TAS), Bruny Island (TAS), Sydney Rock (NSW), Coffin Bay (SA) and Kangaroo Island (SA).

Apart from eating them straight up with a little lemon, I like finely chopping up and almost freezing cucumber (so that they almost become little spheres of cucumber) along with a squirt of finger lime jubes.

We first ate this up at a Wyong hotel/resort about 5 years ago. Genius!

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